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Presently the manager appeared, middle aged, drowsy. "What

time:2023-11-29 15:52:22source:news

The Refuges for Fallen Girls would require considerable funds to keep them going. But the public has never been slow to practically express its sympathy with this class of work.

Presently the manager appeared, middle aged, drowsy.

The Criminal Homes and Prison Gate Operations would require continued help, but not a very great deal. Then, the work in the Slums is somewhat expensive. The eighty young women at present engaged in it cost on an average 12s. per week each for personal maintenance, inclusive of clothes and other little matters, and there are expenses for Halls and some little relief which cannot in anyway be avoided, bringing our present annual Slum outlay to over #4,000. But the poor people amongst whom they work notwithstanding their extreme poverty, are already contributing over #1,000 per annum towards this amount, which income will increase. Still as by this Scheme we propose to add at once a hundred to the number already engaged, money will be required to keep th is department going.

Presently the manager appeared, middle aged, drowsy.

The Inebriate Home, I calculate, will maintain itself. All its inmates will have to engage in some kind of remunerative labour, and we calculate, in addition, upon receiving money with a considerable number of those availing themselves of its benefits. But to practically assist the half-million slaves of the cup we must have money not only to launch out but to keep our operations going.

Presently the manager appeared, middle aged, drowsy.

The Food Depots, once fitted up, pay their own working expenses.

The Emigration, Advice, and Inquiry Bureaux must maintain themselves or nearly so. The Labour Shops, Anti-Sweating, and other similar operations will without question require money to make ends meet. But on the whole, a very small sum of money, in proportion to the immense amount of work done, will enable us to accomplish a vast deal of good.

THE FARM COLONY FROM A FINANCIAL POINT OF VIEW.

Let us now turn to the Farm Colony, and consider it from a monetary standpoint. Here also a certain amount of money will have to be expended at the outset; some of the chief items of which will be the purchase of land, the erection of buildings, the supply of stock, and the production of first crops. There is an abundance of land in the market, at the present time, at very low prices. It is rather important for the initial experiment that an estate should be obtained not too far from London, with land suitable for immediate cultivation. Such an estate would beyond question be expensive. After a time, I have no doubt, we shall be able to deal with land of almost any quality (and that in almost any part of the country), in consequence of the superabundance of labour we shall possess. There is no question if the scheme goes forward, but that estates will be required in connection with all our large towns and cities. I am not without hope that a sufficient quantity of land will be given, or, in any way, sold to us on very favourable terms.

When acquired and stocked, it is calculated that this land, if cultivated by spade husbandry, will support at least two persons per acre. The ordinary reckoning of those who have had experience with allotments gives five persons to three acres. But, even supposing that this calculation is a little too sanguine, we can still reckon a farm of 500 acres supporting, without any outside assistance, say, 750 persons. But, in this Scheme, we should have many advantages not possessed by the simple peasant, such as those resulting from combination, market gardening, and the other forms of cultivation already referred to, and thus we should want to place two or three times this number on that quantity of land.

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then directed the ray of the little lamp toward the further

then directed the ray of the little lamp toward the further

and the listeners felt an involuntary impulse to look upwards,

and the listeners felt an involuntary impulse to look upwards,

cast. As for Edmund, he considered the whole business so

cast. As for Edmund, he considered the whole business so

heart, (closer to which he imperceptibly drew Julia’s

heart, (closer to which he imperceptibly drew Julia’s

the catacombs. Max glanced at the white face of Helen Cumberly,

the catacombs. Max glanced at the white face of Helen Cumberly,

and Julia were not missed till they became quite separated

and Julia were not missed till they became quite separated

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